Intel McAfee Endpoint 10 from Geoff Bock on Vimeo.

The first in a series of explainer videos I’m creating for Intel and McAfee to promote their many security offerings.

Project Manager: Brandon Adams | Light & Heat Films
Animation: Geoff Bock | Flashjack The Hero

"The Rover" is another new addition to the dazzling new wave of Australian cinema.

Australian cinema is having quite a resurgence as of late. A gritty, uncompromising kind of thriller has emerged over the past couple of years from Down Under and it has been exhilarating to behold. From Wish You Were Here to The King Is Dead to Animal Kingdom, Australian filmmakers are bringing it with equal parts beauty and brutality. The Rover, the new film from Animal Kingdom director David Michôd, is no exception.

The Outback has long been an evocative cinematic allegory for, say, the starkness of the soul or the expanse of the human journey, from early Peter Weir films like Walkabout to the Mad Max films to Rabbit Proof Fence, and The Rover easily joins the ranks of those past Australian classics. Starring Guy Pearce and a revelatory Robert Pattinson and taking place “ten years after the collapse”, it’s an economical post-apocalyptic cat and mouse revenge tale about a man (Pearce) “looking for my car…it’s got three men in it.” The car was stolen by Pattinson’s brother (the reliably brilliant Scoot McNairy) and his cohorts during a heist gone terribly wrong that left Pattinson’s character, a slow-witted man child, mistakenly left behind to die. Pearce pursues his car and the three men in it with Pattinson in tow as ransom. Things evolve—and devolve—and nothing ends up as you think it might, and without giving anything away, the reason Pearce is so obsessed with getting his car back turns out to be appropriate and satisfying. It’s a tough, merciless film, though; the landscape is barren and decimated, the people littering the land are battered shells, the dialogue is sparse, the music abrasive, the flesh bloodied, and the guns blazing, but it all adds up to a murky, hypontic noir that is one of the finest Aussie films I’ve seen perhaps ever. It’s about as warm and comforting as a bloody, sweaty shirt at the bottom of a bucket of dirt (you can almost smell the messiness on screen, it’s that vivid), but it’s a bold and fearless piece work and, if you can stomach it, a riveting must-see.

Pearce has never been better and Pattinson made me completely rethink his acting abilities (Edward who?). His performance here is a marvel, somewhere between Billy Bob Thornton’s Sling Blade and a young Jackie Earle Hailey, and if he weren’t so iconic already and we were looking at a debut performance from an unknown, he’d be a star all over again. And it’s always a joy to watch Scoot McNairy, here continuing a winning streak of brilliant script choices on his part. Everyone brings their A game here. The score is mesmerizing, the cinematography stunning, the production dusty and parched, and the casting of the damaged, unhinged characters who wander in and out of the film in harrowing succession is absolutely perfect.

Michôd is proving to be a ferocious filmmaker and he’s part of the reason I keep getting more and more excited to see where Aussie cinema is headed. A side note; The Rover is based on a story by Animal Kingdom and Wish You Were Here (a brilliant but overlooked Australian import from last year) actor Joel Edgerton, who I’ve been a fan of ever since seeing him and Cate Blanchett do Streetcar at BAM. Seek The Rover out, it’s a masterwork.


THE ROVER IS ANOTHER SUPERB ADDITION TO THE DAZZLING NEW WAVE OF AUSTRALIAN CINEMA.

Australian cinema is having quite a resurgence as of late. A gritty, uncompromising kind of thriller has emerged over the past couple of years from Down Under and it has been exhilarating to behold. From Wish You Were Here to The King Is Dead to Animal Kingdom, Australian filmmakers are bringing it with equal parts beauty and brutality. The Rover, the new film from Animal Kingdom director David Michôd, is no exception.

The Outback has long been an evocative cinematic allegory for, say, the starkness of the soul or the expanse of the human journey, from early Peter Weir films like Walkabout to the Mad Max films to Rabbit Proof Fence, and The Rover easily joins the ranks of those past Australian classics. Starring Guy Pearce and a revelatory Robert Pattinson and taking place “ten years after the collapse”, it’s an economical post-apocalyptic cat and mouse revenge tale about a man (Pearce) “looking for my car…it’s got three men in it.” The car was stolen by Pattinson’s brother (the reliably brilliant Scoot McNairy) and his cohorts during a heist gone terribly wrong that left Pattinson’s character, a slow-witted man child, mistakenly left behind to die. Pearce pursues his car and the three men in it with Pattinson in tow as ransom. Things evolve—and devolve—and nothing ends up as you think it might, and without giving anything away, the reason Pearce is so obsessed with getting his car back turns out to be appropriate and satisfying. It’s a tough, merciless film, though; the landscape is barren and decimated, the people littering the land are battered shells, the dialogue is sparse, the music abrasive, the flesh bloodied, and the guns blazing, but it all adds up to a murky, hypontic noir that is one of the finest Aussie films I’ve seen perhaps ever. It’s about as warm and comforting as a bloody, sweaty shirt at the bottom of a bucket of dirt (you can almost smell the messiness on screen, it’s that vivid), but it’s a bold and fearless piece work and, if you can stomach it, a riveting must-see.

Pearce has never been better and Pattinson made me completely rethink his acting abilities (Edward who?). His performance here is a marvel, somewhere between Billy Bob Thornton’s Sling Blade and a young Jackie Earle Hailey, and if he weren’t so iconic already and we were looking at a debut performance from an unknown, he’d be a star all over again. And it’s always a joy to watch Scoot McNairy, here continuing a winning streak of brilliant script choices on his part. Everyone brings their A game here. The score is mesmerizing, the cinematography stunning, the production dusty and parched, and the casting of the damaged, unhinged characters who wander in and out of the film in harrowing succession is absolutely perfect.

Michôd is proving to be a ferocious filmmaker and he’s part of the reason I keep getting more and more excited to see where Aussie cinema is headed. A side note; The Rover is based on a story by Animal Kingdom and Wish You Were Here (a brilliant but overlooked Australian import from last year) actor Joel Edgerton, who I’ve been a fan of ever since seeing him and Cate Blanchett do Streetcar at BAM. Seek The Rover out, it’s a masterwork.


Men’s Health: How Running Makes You High from Geoff Bock on Vimeo.

An explainer video I animated for Men’s Health magazine’s July/August 2014 issue on their iPad + mobile apps, bringing a page of their print version to life.

Nature’s incentive program still isn’t fully understood. Greg Gerdeman, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biology at Eckerd College, explains the current theory.

Creative Direction: Thomas O’Quinn
Illustration: Headcase Design
Animation: Geoff Bock | Flashjack The Hero

Flashjack The Hero Spring 2014 Reel from Geoff Bock on Vimeo.

Presenting the latest reel from Flashjack The Hero, a compilation of motion work featuring greatest hits, new releases, a couple b-sides, and a few demos, updated for Spring 2014. Enjoy! Music: “Water Fountain” by tUnE-yArDs

ADIDAS Four Pillars of Sustainability Explainer Video from Geoff Bock on Vimeo.

A corporate explainer I recently finished for Adidas with the fastest turnaround I’ve ever had on a motion piece. Project manager: Megan Bradford for Paper Krane.

"The scariest ending of any film ever made…" and some project updates for April.

I’m not quite sure where the past 3 or so weeks have gone but, true to form, April is speeding by in a flurry of activity. I’ve been working tirelessly on a bunch of new projects including motion work for adidas, web design and redesign for an animation company and a new (and hopefully disruptive) NYC apartment rental company, a continuing installation for a midtown financial firm, another year of collateral for the University of Colorado, and a viral print/video campaign for a new (and, again, hopefully disruptive) streaming service. They should all be popping up on the site over the next month or two, so stay tuned!

Outside of all the work, there’s plenty culture to be excited about, as well. We live in a world where The Afghan Whigs and The Replacements are working, touring bands again and the art houses are stocked full of good flicks such as Grand Budapest, Only Lovers Left Alive, Under The Skin and more. I just saw Denis Villeneuve’s follow-up to Prisoners (even though it was filmed before that great film from last fall), the appropriately menacingly titled Enemy and it creeped me out in a major way. More so than the works of Lynch and Cronenberg, and that’s saying a lot. The last scene of Enemy has rightfully been called the scariest final scene of any movie ever made and it really did scare the hell out of me. You’ve been warned. That said, Villeneuve is now THE director to watch as he’s on a superb winning streak. The film, about an morose history teacher in a bleak, lifeless Canadian city who discovers—and then stalks—his “twin” starring as an extra in the background of a movie he watches, evokes the experimental horror of the 70s and 80s with such a sure-handed and masterful tone of dread and oppression while being utterly mysterious, subjective and almost completely minimalist in approach. And it’s absolutely terrifying. It’s also far more riveting than my synopsis would suggest, as it’s almost impossible to do the film (and filmmaking) justice with description. Jake Gyllenhaal, Denis’ collaborator on both Enemy and Prisoners, is also knocking one after another out of the park, from Source Code to End of Watch to Prisoners and now Enemy. He’s quietly become the finest and most daring actor of his generation. See it here in a few days, it’s unmissable. As is the film’s poster below. A+!


Designer Dirty Talk; Kevin Drew; BBC Designs Of The Year; Doll & Em, Musings for March 27th, 2014.

A few of my favorite things this week; Doll & Em on HBO is a delightful British export starring Emily Mortimer playing herself and her real life best friend playing her Hollywood assistant. The show, directed by the great Azazel Jacobs (who directed my favorite movie of 2008 Momma’s Man), has that classic HBO-awkward-comedy thing happening and it’s definitely worth checking out.



Designer Dirty Talk is an amusing Tumblr diversion where font size does matter.



Listen to Mexican Aftershow Party, another jam from Kevin Drew’s masterful Darlings LP. What does it all mean? I dunno, but it sure sounds good.



Finally, head over to BBC News to see a slideshow of 76 finalists for Designs of the Year at London’s Design Museum. Everything from typefaces to illustration to furniture design to architecture, they’re all worthy of inclusion in the exhibit.

Retro Breakfast Cereals; Eternal Sunshine Turns 10; Saying Yes To The War On Drugs; Kate Ascher. Musings for March 19th, 2014.

Can you feel it? Spring, my favorite time of year, is imminent and I couldn’t be more ready or happier about it. It’s getting darker later, the blizzards are behind us, and New York is getting restless and randy, despite the promise of a week or two more of chilly weather. Good things are just around the corner, folks, so I thought I’d do a round-up of some of the stuff out there this week that’s putting a spring in my step as we head into a new season.



This list of 54 classic, long-gone breakfast cereals made me happy, snacky, and nostalgic. Powdered Donuts! S’mores! Ice Cream Cones! Why not just a bowl of Snickers bars covered in half & half? I remember many of these. And I’m loving Pac-Man cereal with missing children, video game characters and building set/Lego & Erector set hybrid. 



One of my very favorite movies of all time (and still, I think, the best relationship movie ever made) turns 10 this week and prepare for the retrospective tributes to be popping up this week. I love this movie. It’s exceedingly imaginative, beautiful, and ultimately heartbreaking (or affirming?), and it’s the finest hour for Carrey, Winslet, Gondry and everyone else involved.



The War On Drugs have just released this week what will probably end up being my favorite album of the year Lost In The Dream and, to my surprise (because albums that sound like this don’t usually get this level of praise not because it doesn’t deserve it), it’s getting raves across the board. And I’m talking best of the decade kinds of raves. I couldn’t be happier about that because it really is a perfect record and as original and fresh as it is evocative of 80s-era Petty, Henley, Dylan, Dire Straits, Springsteen, etc. Enjoy Red Eyes, above. The rest of the album is even better. Can’t wait to see them live tomorrow night.



Kate Ascher is one of my favorite authors and her new book is out tomorrow. Her previous books about urban engineering include the fascinating visual explorations of the inner-workings of cities (The Works) and skyscrapers (The Heights), and this time around, in The Way To Go, Kate explores transportation. If you’re into “how things work” geekiness, her books are for you. Check out an excerpt here.

'Cause everybody owns the great ideas, and it feels like there's a big one round the corner.


Elbow never makes a bad record. They don’t write bad songs. Their consistency is almost otherworldly and the world is a better place with them in it. Most of England would agree with me on that, too, seeing as their national treasure across the pond. I’m ears-deep in great new music these days. Between Real Estate and Beck and Mac DeMarco, to name a few, it seems like every week there’s a wonderful new album to enjoy lately. As always, Elbow tower above with their latest The Take Off And Landing Of Everything, with New York Morning one of the many standouts on an album full of ‘em. This song sounded so right on the train today and the beauty of this lyric below nearly made my legs buckle. Lead singer—and personal hero—Guy Garvey’s lyrics are always so perfect, so sweet, so unpretentious, so honest, much like the above video for the song.

The way the day begins
Decides the shade of everything
But the way it ends depends on if you’re home
For every soul, a pillow at a window, please
In a modern Rome, where folk are nice to Yoko.

 

'Cause everybody owns the great ideas, and it feels like there's a big one round the corner.


Elbow never makes a bad record. They don’t write bad songs. Their consistency is almost otherworldly and the world is a better place with them in it. Most of England would agree with me on that, too, seeing as their national treasure across the pond. I’m ears-deep in great new music these days. Between Real Estate and Beck and Mac DeMarco, to name a few, it seems like every week there’s a wonderful new album to enjoy lately. As always, Elbow tower above with their latest The Take Off And Landing Of Everything, with New York Morning one of the many standouts on an album full of ‘em. This song sounded so right on the train today and the beauty of this lyric below made my legs nearly buckle. Lead singer—and personal hero—Guy Garvey’s lyrics are always so perfect, so sweet, so unpretentious, so honest, much like the above video for the song.

The way the day begins
Decides the shade of everything
But the way it ends depends on if you’re home
For every soul, a pillow at a window, please
In a modern Rome, where folk are nice to Yoko.

 

'Cause everybody owns the great ideas, and it feels like there's a big one round the corner.


Elbow never makes a bad record. They don’t write bad songs. Their consistency is almost otherworldly and the world is a better place with them in it. Most of England would agree with me on that, too, seeing as their national treasure across the pond. I’m ears-deep in great new music these days. Between Real Estate and Beck and Mac DeMarco, to name a few, it seems like every week there’s a wonderful new album to enjoy lately. As always, Elbow tower above with their latest The Take Off And Landing Of Everything, with New York Morning one of the many standouts on an album full of ‘em. This song sounded so right on the train today and the beauty of this lyric below made my legs buckle. Lead singer—and personal hero—Guy Garvey’s lyrics are always so perfect, so sweet, so unpretentious, so honest, much like the above video for the song.

The way the day begins
Decides the shade of everything
But the way it ends depends on if you’re home
For every soul, a pillow at a window, please
In a modern Rome, where folk are nice to Yoko.

 

You’re not just on Diet Coke…

63 years later, Vasilis Dimitriou is the last living movie billboard painter in Greece.


Greek painter Vasilis Dimitriou, who has been painting movie billboards and posters since he was 15, is still going strong with no signs of slowing down, even as his craft borders on extinction. Technology is grand and all—I couldn’t do what I do for a living without the benefits of modern technology—but there are some things I just don’t want to go away. Hats off to Dimitriou and his (almost) lost art. The artists and designers of film posters have always been people I admire, and I even got the chance in my career to design a handful of posters. It’s tougher than it looks and a fascinating art form. Here’s a great doc on Netflix about another titan of movie poster design Drew Struzan, whose work everyone almost certainly knows from the Spielberg/Lucas heyday of cinema. Here’s more of Dimitriou’s work:




Faux-Bass does Oscar 2014 & a farewell to the father of Helvetica.


Still debating that Oscar telecast tonight, but while I mull, here’s a clever poster series from designer Neven Udovicic that imagines the key art for today’s Oscar nominees as Saul Bass works. It’s startling—and not surprising in the least—how fresh Bass’ style remains. Timeless.



Speaking of timeless, an honorary mention of the passing of designer Mike Parker last week. Parker and his team took inspiration in the 50s from Swiss type and, with a few modifications here and there, gave the world Helvetica, one of the 1,000+ typefaces he’s responsible for.